Marvel

Where to start reading Black Panther comics?

  • Fabien 

Unlike a character like Spider-Man, Marvel’s Black Panther doesn’t have a great track record. There are good stories, but there are more bad or just forgettable ones. And a lot has not been collected yet. But let’s try anyway to explore the character.

Who is Black Panther?

First things first, Black Panther probably needs an introduction. He already appeared in the MCU and will have his own movie soon. For now, let’s go back to 1966 when he made his first appearance in Fantastic Four #52. Created by Stan Lee and the great Jack Kirby, Black Panther is known to be the first black superhero in mainstream comic books.

The Black Panther is a title that is given to the chief of the Panther Tribe of the advanced African nation of Wakanda. He’s more than a symbol or a superhero, he is head of state.

Under the mask, we find T’Challa who earned the title of the Black Panther by defeating the various champions of the Wakandan tribes. After that, he led his country in a fruitful direction, amassing money and power.

T’Challa was once a member of the Avengers, but also Daredevil. But those are long stories to tell.

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Where to start reading Spider-Man comics?

  • Fabien 

Writing reading guides for some minor characters, I realized how unhelpful this kind of approach will be for major ones. It’s especially the case with Spider-Man my favorite Marvel Superhero. I think I’ll come back to write about specific storylines, but to start, I think it’s better to go with a guide to the best entry points in Peter Parker’s long and eventful life.

Who is Spider-man?

Well, I don’t know who can ask something like that, but if you lived in a cave during the last half-century, Spider-Man is a superhero in the Marvel Universe.

Created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Spidey first appeared in the anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 published in August 1962. His secret identity is Peter Parker and, when everything began, he was a high school student raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben in New York City.

When Peter was bitten by a radioactive spider at a science exhibit, he acquired arachnid-like capabilities – a great agility, proportionate strength and even a sixth sense to detect danger. First, he used his powers to gain money, but he had to learn the hard way that with great power comes great responsibility when his uncle is killed by a man he didn’t stop when he had the chance.

After that, Spidey began to fight crime while helping his aunt with a job at the Daily Bugle.

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Jessica Jones Reading Order, From Alias to the Defenders

You probably have heard of Jessica Jones. You know, the one with a Netflix show. I didn’t watch it, but I know it exists. There’s that. Well, if you’re reading comics, Jessica Jones started as a PI with an avenger past. For more, let’s go into the details with a mildly spoilery reading order, as always.

Who Is Jessica Jones?

Created by writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Michael Gaydos, Jessica Jones first appeared in Alias #1 (November 2001), a Max imprint – which means adult content and language.

Bendis introduced her as a former superhero who becomes a private investigator, working for her own agency, Alias Private Investigations. She was retconned in the Marvel universe, becoming a student who was in school with Peter Parker and an ex-avenger.

Jessica Jones acquired her powers by coming in contact with experimental chemicals. She then spent time in a coma and woke with superhuman abilities. She possesses superhuman strength, has the ability to flight, and was given a degree of psionic protection by Jean Grey after being attacked by the Purple Man.

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Death of Wolverine Reading Order, a guide to the deadly Marvel Event

  • Fabien 

If there’s one X-Men that will not die, it’s Wolverine. He is just too much popular for that, even if they go down that road in the movie universe. Well, in the comics, they also killed Logan but, you know, it’s Marvel! That said, in 2014, there was a big pseudo-crossover event around the death of Wolverine.

What’s the Death of Wolverine?

Like I said, it’s a Marvel Event that lead to the death of the most famous x-man in all the universes, especially ours. There’s a big problem though, Wolverine can’t be killed… or can he? Logan will indeed lose is healing factor, then come the famous death.

There’s a bounty on Wolverine’s head, a price so big his enemies and few assassins can’t pass the chance. The race is on to find Wolverine, but who put out the contract? When Logan discovers that his mystery foe wants him alive, he turns on the offensive. As the hunted becomes the hunter once more, he’s determined to die the way he lived.

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X-23 Reading Order: Where to start with the new Wolverine?

After watching the trailer for the next Wolverine movie, it seems clear to me that X-23 is gonna be big in a few months and some people will certainly want to know more about this mini-wolvy. Why wait for the movie? Let’s start now! Even if this is a relatively new character in the X-Men timeline, X-23 already got a bit of history under her belt.

Who is X-23 a.k.a. Laura Kinney?

The short answer is that X-23 is a sort of clone of Wolverine. The Facility is an organization who attempted to recreate Weapon X and failed. The geneticist Sarah Kinney thought that cloning was the way to go, but the genome recovered from Wolverine was too damaged. Sarah decided to alter the DNA against the Facility orders and Laura was born. She was trained to kill Wolverine, but when she got the opportunity, she joined the X-Men. Wolverine became a father figure to her and, now, she is his legacy.

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How to read The Clone Conspiracy, a Spidey event ?

  • Fabien 

When Marvel announced Civil War II, I was afraid because the first one didn’t really help Spider-man. On the contrary, pardon my French, but the post-Civil War was a shit show for Spidey. One More Day anyone ??? Fortunately, our friendly neighborhood Spider-man was untouched. In fact, Carol Danvers is the real victim this time around, the one I am seeing for now. Maybe not the only one. I mean, Rhodey, Banner, Stark, even Hawkeye (but we get a solo Kate Bishop in return, not a bad deal), they all pay a stupid price.

Meanwhile, Peter Parker was preparing for The Clone Conspiracy, his own event. Maybe I should have started with the Civil War II reading guide, but I prefer talking about less enraging things today.

What is The Clone Conspiracy?

As I was saying, it’s the actual Spidey Event. The full name of the storyline is Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy. It’s been written by Dan Slott, with Christos Gage. Jim Cheung is the artist.

If there is “clone” in the title, of course, the Jackal is back. Weirdly, this time he took the form of a mysterious man in a red suit with an Anubis mask. He visits Spider-Man’s enemies and offers them a deal: he will revive their lost loved ones if they follow his orders. Peter’s family is touched by a tragedy and his enemies allied against him, then dead people come back to life… of course, that’s only the beginning and there are a lot of twists and turns.

Information This article will not be updated anymore. Since we have launched a blog dedicated to comic book reading orders, you can find an up-to-date version of the Clone Conspiracy Reading Order here.

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