comic books

Death of Wolverine Reading Order, a guide to the deadly Marvel Event

  • Fabien 

If there’s one X-Men that will not die, it’s Wolverine. He is just too much popular for that, even if they go down that road in the movie universe. Well, in the comics, they also killed Logan but, you know, it’s Marvel! That said, in 2014, there was a big pseudo-crossover event around the death of Wolverine.

What’s the Death of Wolverine?

Like I said, it’s a Marvel Event that lead to the death of the most famous x-man in all the universes, especially ours. There’s a big problem though, Wolverine can’t be killed… or can he? Logan will indeed lose is healing factor, then come the famous death.

There’s a bounty on Wolverine’s head, a price so big his enemies and few assassins can’t pass the chance. The race is on to find Wolverine, but who put out the contract? When Logan discovers that his mystery foe wants him alive, he turns on the offensive. As the hunted becomes the hunter once more, he’s determined to die the way he lived.

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Locke and Key Reading Order: How to read Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez’s series?

Some series don’t require a reading order. It’s mostly the case with Locke and Key. I should say that it was mostly the case, because Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodríguez recently produced a prequel story with the promise that there will be more soon.

I have decided to start now, because why wait? I’ll update this reading order with each new addition to the series.

What is Locke and Key about?

Locke and Key is a comic book series written by Joe Hill and illustrated by Gabriel Rodríguez. The main story is about the Locke family, present day. After the murder of their father, Tyler, Kinsey, and Bode Locke move with their mother Nina to the family estate of Keyhouse, located in Lovecraft, Massachusetts. The young Bode soon uncovers The Ghost Door which separates his spirit from his body. With his brother and sister, they begin discovering more secrets and the keys that open more than doors. Each key brings a lot of possibilities and problems, but the real danger is outside with those who want the keys for themselves.

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Where to start with The Sandman’s Death of the Endless?

As promise, we continue into the world of Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman. This particular series has inspired numerous spin-offs. There are a few anthologies, numerous one shot, miniseries and other specials – few were written by Neil Gaiman.

The character of Death is not one of those who were lucky enough to get an ongoing series, unlike Lucifer and Dead Boy Detectives, even if she is extremely popular. That said, we still can find Death in a few publications outside the main Sandman story.

Who is Death of the Endless?

Let’s start with a presentation, for those who didn’t read The Sandman. In this Vertigo series, the Endless are the personification of concepts. They all play a specific part in the human world. Dream (or Morpheus) is the king of the Dreaming Wold, where you go when you sleep. His older sister is Death and she mostly meets with the recently deceased and guides them into their next existence.

Death is the second eldest of Endless and possibly the more powerful being in the Universe. In The Sandman, Death takes the appearance of a young goth woman. She is omnipotence and omnipresence, being with all those who die when they die.

Information This article will not be updated anymore. Since we have launched a blog dedicated to comic book reading orders, you can find an up-to-date version of this The Sandman’s Death Reading Order here.

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X-23 Reading Order: Where to start with the new Wolverine?

After watching the trailer for the next Wolverine movie, it seems clear to me that X-23 is gonna be big in a few months and some people will certainly want to know more about this mini-wolvy. Why wait for the movie? Let’s start now! Even if this is a relatively new character in the X-Men timeline, X-23 already got a bit of history under her belt.

Who is X-23 a.k.a. Laura Kinney?

The short answer is that X-23 is a sort of clone of Wolverine. The Facility is an organization who attempted to recreate Weapon X and failed. The geneticist Sarah Kinney thought that cloning was the way to go, but the genome recovered from Wolverine was too damaged. Sarah decided to alter the DNA against the Facility orders and Laura was born. She was trained to kill Wolverine, but when she got the opportunity, she joined the X-Men. Wolverine became a father figure to her and, now, she is his legacy.

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How to read The Clone Conspiracy, a Spidey event ?

  • Fabien 

When Marvel announced Civil War II, I was afraid because the first one didn’t really help Spider-man. On the contrary, pardon my French, but the post-Civil War was a shit show for Spidey. One More Day anyone ??? Fortunately, our friendly neighborhood Spider-man was untouched. In fact, Carol Danvers is the real victim this time around, the one I am seeing for now. Maybe not the only one. I mean, Rhodey, Banner, Stark, even Hawkeye (but we get a solo Kate Bishop in return, not a bad deal), they all pay a stupid price.

Meanwhile, Peter Parker was preparing for The Clone Conspiracy, his own event. Maybe I should have started with the Civil War II reading guide, but I prefer talking about less enraging things today.

What is The Clone Conspiracy?

As I was saying, it’s the actual Spidey Event. The full name of the storyline is Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy. It’s been written by Dan Slott, with Christos Gage. Jim Cheung is the artist.

If there is “clone” in the title, of course, the Jackal is back. Weirdly, this time he took the form of a mysterious man in a red suit with an Anubis mask. He visits Spider-Man’s enemies and offers them a deal: he will revive their lost loved ones if they follow his orders. Peter’s family is touched by a tragedy and his enemies allied against him, then dead people come back to life… of course, that’s only the beginning and there are a lot of twists and turns.

Information This article will not be updated anymore. Since we have launched a blog dedicated to comic book reading orders, you can find an up-to-date version of the Clone Conspiracy Reading Order here.

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The Boys Reading Order: How to read Garth Ennis’ satirical comics ?

If there was only one Garth Ennis to read, it wouldn’t be The Boys, because nothing is better than Preacher. That said, in my opinion, The Boys is quite fun, especially if you are a superhero comics fan.

What is The Boys about?

Illustrated by Darick Robertson, The Boys follows Billy Butcher and his team. They work for the CIA in order to keep an eye on the superhero community. Of course, because Ennis wrote this, the “heroes” are mostly fuck ups. Everything starts when Wee Hughie – based on Simon Pegg – watched his girlfriend being killed in front of him by a superhero who didn’t care about the collateral damages. Butcher invites him to join his team in the US and teaches him all he needs to know about the birth of superheroes and how they are just propaganda material for a failed military consortium.

The Boys is full of Marvel and DC references, there’s although an Animal House storyline and a lot of really dark and disturbing things, you know, like in a Garth Ennis comics. I really like the idea that the heroes are just for show and the comics industry told “their” stories which is basically a tool to criticize the real industry. It’s satirical, but it’s not the main point. The evolution of Hughie and Butcher is the heart of the story. Overall, The Boys is pure Ennis with a lot of rage, a lot of dark and twisted humor, a lot of violence, really good characters and a healthy dose of emotions.

Information This article will not be updated anymore. Since we have launched a blog dedicated to comic book reading orders, you can find an up-to-date version of this Boys Reading Order here.

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How to read Criminal, a comic by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips ?

  • Fabien 

As I said in my first message, even if the main point of this website is to provide the best reading order guide I can produce, I also want to write about some great comics that don’t require a lot of guidance.

I’m starting with a modern classic, Criminal by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips. This is for those of you who love crime stories with all the clichés and violence that you can think of, but those are still greats.

What is Criminal?

In short, Criminal is kind of a crime anthology. Each arc follows a different character. They all live in the same universe though, and some are connected, but the stories work independently from one another.

To this day, there are 7 stories, the last ones were published a few months ago after a four years break. I personally hope there will be more.

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Dirk Gently books in Order: How to read Douglas Adams’s series?

  • Fabien 

By the author of The Hitchhiker’s guide to the Galaxy.

Who’s Dirk Gently?

Douglas Adams was not the most skilled writer of his generation, by far. Nevertheless, his talent was to build incredible and highly entertaining stories that were smart, really funny and imaginative. The way he structured his stories were brilliant, in particular with the Dirk Gently series. Not as popular as The Hitchhiker’s guide to the Galaxy, the adventures of this insufferable holistic detective are just a delight for those who love a bit of absurdity with a spark of intelligence.

So, this is the story of Svlad Cjelli also known as Dirk Gently, a detective, a holistic detective to be accurate. He uses the fundamental interconnectedness of all things to solve mysteries. Even if he doesn’t want to believe in such things, Gently is a psychic.

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